CONAHEC News and Information

Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020

College sophomore Cameron Lynch has lived the past five months in a single square mile, only venturing outside her home a couple of times a week for early-morning or late-night walks. 

"It’s already a stressful time to be immunocompromised," said Lynch, who has Type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and a form of muscular dystrophy. "Now, a good portion of able-bodied people are going back to the way life was, leaving us behind."

Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020

Colleges that are reopening campuses this fall know they’re bringing a higher risk of coronavirus to their community.

The questions aren’t really about if or when, but about how bad outbreaks could be – and whether having an in-person experience for students is worth the cost. With so much at stake, some students, parents and faculty are asking: Why take the risk at all? 

In many cases, it comes back to money. 

For months, colleges and experts have warned another semester of remote courses could have disastrous effects on student enrollment and college budgets.

Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020

When Rutgers University announced most of its fall classes would be online amid the coronavirus pandemic, rising junior Shreya Patel checked for details on the school's website. "Will we get a refund?" she looked up in the Frequently Asked Questions section.

"They said no. That obviously made me mad," Patel told CNN.

"It just doesn't make sense to be paying such a high amount for something that's not being used to the full advantage."

Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020

The number of new coronavirus cases in the U.S. climbed but remained below 50,000 for the fourth day in a row, as some universities and schools moved classes online to avoid campus outbreaks.

The U.S. on Tuesday reported more than 44,000 new coronavirus cases, up sharply from the previous day’s 35,112, but lower than recent peaks this month and in July, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Total cases in the U.S. approached 5.5 million, while the nation’s death toll neared 172,000.

Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020

Last month, I interviewed Tim Foster, President of Colorado Mesa University who told me about the University’s plan to hold tuition flat for the 2020-21 school year. In the weeks that followed, a growing number of institutions announced changes to their tuition and fee plans, as students (and institutions) grappled with the realities of an unprecedented academic year. Although College Pulse data suggests that some 90 percent of students expect tuition cuts for classes moved online, far fewer have announced plans to reduce the cost of tuition.

Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020

Sara Goldrick-Rab is Professor of Sociology and Medicine and Founding Director of the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University. Christine Baker-Smith is Managing Director and Director of Research at the Hope Center.

As the fall season approaches, students and higher education administrators are preparing for a difficult return to college.

With both the coronavirus pandemic and overdue attention to systemic racism confronting the sector, one thing is clear: For many, a new mindset is required to produce positive results for students.

Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020

Sara Goldrick-Rab is Professor of Sociology and Medicine and Founding Director of the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University. Christine Baker-Smith is Managing Director and Director of Research at the Hope Center.

As the fall season approaches, students and higher education administrators are preparing for a difficult return to college.

With both the coronavirus pandemic and overdue attention to systemic racism confronting the sector, one thing is clear: For many, a new mindset is required to produce positive results for students.

Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020

Young people who are the first in their family to go to university are less likely to attend an elite institution and are more likely to drop out than those with graduate parents, according to new research led by the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies. 

Published today in the Oxford Review Of Education, the study is the first to use large scale nationally representative data to explore the experiences of first generation or ‘first in the family’ university students in England, a group which has been prioritised in initiatives designed to widen access to higher education. 

Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020

Not long after the COVID-19 pandemic caused colleges to start teaching remotely, students balked at the idea of paying full tuition for online learning. It’s not hard to understand why. After all, they were not getting the football and basketball games, student clubs, access to labs and the library and the out-of-class conversations that are all part of the typical campus experience.

Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020

Businesses — whether large or small, or whether they are healthcare, educational cultural or recreational institutions — all have been tragically affected by COVID-19. For colleges and universities, the beginning of the fall semester will be especially challenging. 

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