CONAHEC News and Information

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

The multistate effort, filed in the US District Court in Massachusetts on Monday against the Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, also seeks to stop the policy from going into effect while the case is being decided.

Monday's lawsuit, a largely Democrat-led effort, is headed up by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey.

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

Joint coalition lawsuit statement:

A coalition of 20 of the country’s premier research institutions, liberal arts colleges and public universities in the West sued the federal government today to block the U.S. Department of Homeland Security from revoking visas for international students whose studies will be entirely online in the fall.

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

Frat parties, football teams, and college bars were all petri dishes for fresh COVID-19 outbreaks this summer, and public health experts are warning that we’ll see even more as campuses around the country reopen this fall.

And there will be a whole new hot spot thrown into the mix: dorms.

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

The administration of President Donald Trump issued new rules this week that could force tens of thousands of international students to leave the United States if their schools hold all classes online amid the coronavirus pandemic, causing panic among colleges and foreign students.

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

If there’s a cruel way to handle an immigration issue, the nation can rest assured that the Trump administration will find it.

The latest chapter in President Trump’s book, “How to Close Down a Nation to Foreigners” (and no, that’s not a real book), is a pending order that international students enrolled in U.S. colleges must attendin-person classes or leave the country. Never mind that the colleges themselves are still trying to figure out how to start the upcoming academic year as the pace of the coronavirus outbreak seems to be accelerating.

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

The conventional wisdom holds that most students and instructors alike were deeply dissatisfied with their experiences with emergency remote learning this spring. Numerous surveys of students and parents have said as much, and many college leaders seem to be taking those attitudes to heart in their planning for fall. In announcing that they will return as much as possible to in-person instruction, more than a few have cited dissatisfaction with virtual learning as a factor, along with significant financial and cultural reasons.

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

Colleges and universities in the United States, already highly challenged to decide how much to move online and lose tens of millions of dollars in revenue, or open for business as usual and put countless lives at health risk, now face added political pressure.

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

In two months, 19-year-old Tianyu Fang is due to start his first semester at one of the most prestigious schools in America: Stanford University in California. Now, the Chinese national isn't sure if he'll make it.

Mercredi, juil. 15, 2020

Many U.S. colleges were scrambling on Tuesday to modify plans for the fall semester in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic a day after the Trump administration issued an order that could force tens of thousands of foreign students to leave the country if their schools hold all classes online.

Mardi, juil. 14, 2020

Some colleges and universities are adjusting how they will be teaching students in the fall offering most of their classes online, but the financial cost of higher learning is expected to remain the same as those institutions charge full price.

Those colleges making the change to an online environment include Harvard University, the 23 campuses of California State University, and Hampton University.

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