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UK, Ireland top U-Multirank on teaching and learning

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:38
The fifth edition of U-Multirank provides new insight into the relative strengths and weaknesses of different higher education systems around Europe and the United States of America, with the Unit ...

Graduates overqualified for the work they do

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:36
More than one in every four Australian graduates are overqualified for the jobs they take on after completing their degrees.

Researchers from the University of Western Australia (UWA), Curtin ...

NEPAD agency partners with UK universities to set up hub

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:34
The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) agency and Durham University in the United Kingdom are to jointly set up an Africa Hub to help African countries and universities increase thei ...

Foreign researchers pessimistic about career - Survey

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:32
A pilot survey of more than 1,000 foreign researchers at Aarhus University has found that most foreign scientists are not optimistic about being able to forge a career in Denmark. The survey is ex ...

University bar lowered to raise rural doctor recruitment

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:30
The government of North Rhine-Westphalia intends to introduce incentives for medical students to commit themselves to work as country doctors for 10 years. The scheme centres on special admission ...

Health systems crisis - Medical deans proffer solutions

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:14
South African medical deans say they stand ready to make available expertise in the university sector to help the country deal with the crisis in the national health system and "systemic failures" ...

Some universities better at tackling student drop-out

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:12
About one in seven of the nearly one million Australian university students will drop out of their courses during the three or four years they spend as undergraduates.

Remarkably, however, the ...

African student flows - Challenging prevailing paradigms

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:10
From 11-13 June 2018, researchers representing seven African countries and officials gathered to share their case country results based on a three-year research study on international mobility to ...

Automating recognition of academic qualifications

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:08
The Norwegian Agency for Quality Assurance in Education (NOKUT - Norwegian ENIC-NARIC) has just introduced a ...

Addressing sexual harassment as institutional failure

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:06
In Africa, enrolling in higher education institutions is an aspiration of many young people and their families and represents an investment in their own socio-economic progress. This is why univer ...

How to improve selection for professional schools

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:04
Every year, students around the world will spend countless hours and even significant amounts of money optimising their applications for professional schools. This is a stressful time for students ...

Universities suffer under free-tuition regimes

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:02
A recent University World News article reported on the funding freeze to ...

Academics for Peace - Imprisonment, censorship continue

University World News Global Edition - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 07:00
In 2012, the Turkish government announced that it had participated in peace talks with the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK). This was followed by a mutual ceasefire in 2013. However, this peace proc ...

Chinese media: US new visa limit may deter students

The PIE News - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 06:52

The recent decision to shorten the length of visa issued to Chinese student applicants in certain “sensitive” subject areas made the headlines in the Chinese media, with much of the commentary suggesting that other countries or China itself may benefit from the new rule.

Beginning June 11, the US State Department recently confirmed new screening instructions that could result in one-year visa for Chinese international students who plan to study in some STEM fields in the US.

Some Chinese media criticised that the new policy as “destructive” towards the USA’s economy and technological development.

“They may not consider US as one of the option like before”

AI Era, a Chinese media company publishing on technology and internet sector, claimed that the new policy discourages Chinese students from studying in US universities and could motivate them to study in their home country or elsewhere.

Thus, it will gradually lead to a decline in quality of students which can negatively impact the American STEM field in long run.

“Some of my students are considering to finish their postgraduate [degree] in Japan or other countries, these places may be easier to obtain visas and achieve their future plans,” confirmed Zhang-tao, an aviator and robotics lecturer from Tsinghua University. “They may not consider US as one of the option like before.”

Some of the coverage allied the move to the new tariffs on Chinese imports imposed by Trump and associated restrictions on investment into the US high-tech industries.

Despite concerns of whether the new policy will affect the progress of China’s “Made in China 2025” industrial strategy (turbo-boosting its manufacturing and high-tech capabilities), Chinese media believes that this sort of restriction from the US will not have a massive effect on China’s own ambitious plans.

Wen Wei Po, a state-owned Hong Kong based newspaper, explained that Chinese students can choose to study in the European Union or accelerate their own research and development as an alternative.

The US may not have the absolute advantages on technology and aviation development compared with EU, it noted.

“The inflow of Chinese talents helps to stimulate competition of US economy and technology development. Now, Trump wants to keep skilled workforce out of the door of the United States. In the long run, he is actually doing something “destructive” to the US’s economy.”

The South China Morning Post ran a story in which students said the news would not affect their plans, although one student said he felt there could be more commitment from students to contributing to Made in China 2025 in the long run.

According to the US government, there are more than one million international students who currently study in the States, about one-third of them are from mainland China and a large portion are studying in STEM fields.

The post Chinese media: US new visa limit may deter students appeared first on The PIE News.

Inaugural ‘State of the Field’ report reveals recruitment spending

The PIE News - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 06:32

The International Enrolment Management Knowledge Community recently presented the results of its first ‘State of the Field’ survey, which hoped to assess the international education sector by asking the views of professionals working on the enrolment side of the business.

300 professionals working in the industry responded to the call, 90% of which were based in the US. The study asked for respondents views on a personal-professional level, rather than an institutional level.

The survey threw up many interesting revelations, from the reasons institutions recruit internationally (38% said “Generate revenue”), to the issues professionals see as important to the sector in the next year.

“Politics is just the very public tip of a much larger iceberg”

But perhaps most shocking was the reported levels of institutional spending on international recruitment travel, and the level of planning at a departmental or institutional level.

32% of respondents said their institution spent less than $10k annually on ‘recruitment travel’. Furthermore, 38% told the survey their institution had “no plan” for international enrolment management, and 11% said the institution was not working on one.

When presenting this fact, David Di Maria, associate vice provost for international education at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, asked if this is the case, “are they really trying to recruit internationally?”.

But the recruitment outlook is negative for many, the report revealed, with 67% of respondents “uncertain” to some extent that their institution would hit the next recruitment target.

The reasons for this doubt are varied, but a large percentage blamed “political climate”. Among those who declared they were “very uncertain” of hitting targets, 43% blamed the world-wide political theatre.

It may be tempting to jump to the conclusion that the respondents were referring to the presidency of Donald Trump and his tempestuous policy decisions, but Di Maria warned against such thought. Instead, he pointed out the strong US dollar would be a detraction for some international students, and campus safety fears enhanced by recent mass shootings were also having an impact.

“Are they really trying to recruit internationally?”

However, when the question was widened to “Thinking within the broader context of the field of international enrolment management, what are your top three concerns?” 52% of all respondents cited political climate as their top concern. A further 31% said it was their second most pressing concern, with 24% returning politics as the third most concerning global factor to the recruitment landscape.

Again, Di Maria had a word of warning for those who may assume that, with a largely North American pool, the survey results would shed a light on feelings about current US politics.

However, he pointed to global trends such as Brexit and other worldwide political movements. But a crucial difference which Di Maria also noted was the prevalence of local politics around the world also having an effect on the North American sector.

But politics is just the “very public tip of a much larger iceberg,” Di Maria stated. Institutional issues, such as cost and university leadership were also highlighted as causes for concern, and should be taken equally seriously Di Maria warned.

Despite dour notes among the results, the presentation ended on a bright note, with Di Maria and fellow presenters George Kacenga, of the University of Colorado, Denver and  Jack Sullivan, director of programs at the University of Pennsylvania, noting that with coherent strategy, HEIs can secure better investment.

With that, which is not impossible, the industry and the institutions will see growth they concluded.

The post Inaugural ‘State of the Field’ report reveals recruitment spending appeared first on The PIE News.

Chronicle of Higher Education: As Calls to Resign Grow Louder, Michigan State’s Interim President Digs In

“I continue to look ahead,” said John Engler on Friday, as two trustees and several lawmakers called on him to step down.

Chronicle of Higher Education: As Calls for Resignation Grow Louder, Michigan State’s Interim President Digs In

“I continue to look ahead,” said John Engler on Friday, as two trustees and several lawmakers called on him to step down.

Chronicle of Higher Education: 2 Michigan State Trustees Join Chorus: Engler Must Resign

Brian Mosallam and Dianne Byrum have called for the university’s interim president, John Engler, to step down.

Chronicle of Higher Education: Michigan State Trustee Joins Chorus: Engler Must Resign

Brian Mosallam on Friday became the first trustee to call for the university’s interim president, John Engler, to step down.

ILAC offering scholarships for Hispanic women

The PIE News - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 05:11

The International Language Academy of Canada has announced it will provide $100,000CAD in scholarships for ambitious Hispanic women who wish to study English in a Canadian institution.

The scholarships are being offered in partnership with the Canadian Hispanic Business Alliance and are open to young women from all Spanish speaking countries who demonstrate leadership skills in their communities.

“Our goal is to empower young women in Spanish speaking countries”

To be eligible, applicants must have been born in and currently living in a Spanish speaking country, and be 19 years of age by the time of program start.

Since its inception in 2007, ILAC has been forward-thinking in promoting Canada as a study destination for students from Spanish speaking countries.

Latin America is an important market for ILAC, with 39% of its students from the region.

“Our goal is to empower young women in Spanish speaking countries by giving them the chance to learn English at a world-class institution in Canada,” explained Jonathan Kolber, co-founder of ILAC.

“One of our biggest markets has always been Latin America, and in fact, our first student was from Colombia. We soon followed with students from various Spanish speaking countries, including Mexico, Ecuador, Chile, Venezuela, Spain, Argentina and the rest of Latin America, including Brazil.”

Kolber told The PIE News that as a result, the ILAC team feels that they are part of the Latin American community, and wanted to give back through the scholarship scheme.

“The community has been supportive of ILAC since the first day we opened and this is our way of saying thank you,” he added.

To apply for one of the scholarships, students are asked to submit a one-minute video describing their achievements and goals in community service and leadership. The submissions will be judged on the basis of their content and creativity.

An ILAC spokesperson told The PIE that they have so far have received inquiries from students in Spain, Mexico, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Peru, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Cuba.

“We are requesting that students work directly with one of our ILAC representatives in their country to ensure they will be approved for a visa, as the requirements are different for each market,” they added.

Scholarship applications are being accepted until July 1, 2018.

The post ILAC offering scholarships for Hispanic women appeared first on The PIE News.

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